Here’s How to Wash Your Dishes Instead, Microbiome analysis and confocal microscopy of used kitchen sponges reveal massive colonization by Acinetobacter, Moraxella and Chryseobacterium species. It’s steeped in warm water and foamy suds every day, so it’s basically self-cleaning, right? If not properly cleaned, your kitchen sponge can transfer these germs to your countertops, appliances, and food preparation surfaces. The Mail Online carried a reasonably accurate report of the research. The latest insights come from a team of researchers in Germany who use genetic sequencing to compile the most comprehensive list of sponge bacteria to date. If you are a Zinio, Nook, Kindle, Apple, or Google Play subscriber, you can enter your website access code to gain subscriber access. Previous research has shown that kitchen sponges contain more active bacteria than anywhere else in the house—including the toilet. Researchers squeezed out a bunch of kitchen sponges and found at least 362 different types of bacteria living inside. Yes, your kitchen sponge is a huge and shady nightclub for bacteria. Prevent It With These Tips, Why Silk Is One of the Best Materials For Face Masks, Why a COVID-19 Vaccine Is Key For Returning to Normalcy. 1. A recent survey by the Hygiene Council found that the average kitchen drain has 567,845 bacteria per square inch (second only to the toilet). Best to go on living in quiet fear. Using the microwave is another great way to kill bacteria in a kitchen sponge. In Egert’s study, sponges that were cleaned with soap and water actually ended up with colonies of bacteria that had developed resistance to detergents. It's like bacterial heaven," said Gerba. A recent study published on Scientific reports proved that your kitchen sponge contains more bacteria than your toilet. COVID-19: A Basic Guide to Different Vaccine Types and How They Work, What Monoclonal Antibodies Are — and Why We Need Them As Well As a Vaccine. And what do you do with that bacteria-infested sponge? How COVID-19 Measures Might Be Impacting Your Microbiome — and What to Do About It. “Cleaning, especially by non-cleaning experts at home, usually does not clean all the bacteria inside because there is such a large amount of microbes. The hot water and heat will kill bacteria, as long as you use the full energy cycle, not the energy-saving settings. Kitchen Sponges Breed Bacteria. Food that sticks to a brush can’t bury itself inside and is easily spotted and removed. And if you think 'cleaning' with hot water or a stint in the microwave helps, you're wrong. Let the sponge dry after each use to avoid an overgrowth of bacteria. "Cleaning a Dirty Sponge Only Helps Its Worst Bacteria, Study Says," The New York Times put it . Based on a new study from a team of German researchers, their estimates show that a sugar-cube sized piece of the most bacteria-dense part of the sponge would have 54 billion bacterial cells. Home » Why you need to get rid of your kitchen sponge… TODAY! Read our privacy policy. The dirtiest places in your kitchen. "Your Kitchen Sponge Is Gross, and Cleaning It Isn't Helping," New York magazine's headline read. Sponges and dishcloths. Microwaving and boiling sponges were shown to reduce bacteria by 60 percent, but this only worked in a lab setting, not in used kitchen sponges. The results aren’t surprising, but they are illustrative of just how tenacious household bacteria are. As an Amazon Associate, Easy Health Options may earn from qualifying purchases. This super-absorbent sponge absorbs 3-times more water than traditional cellulose sponges, while deep cleaning grooves provide constant contact with the scrubbing surface. Of course, not all bacteria in the kitchen or elsewhere are dangerous -- some can even be beneficial. Your email address is used to log in and will not be shared or sold. Related: The deadly E. coli germs in your kitchen. Any links on this web site to web sites operated by third parties are provided for your convenience only. They stay drier (you can stand them up and let them drip), are easier to clean thoroughly, and they don’t have the crevices that sponges do, where microbes can set up housekeeping. This is because the sponge is used to wipe away food scraps. Up to 200,000 bacteria live in dirty kitchen sponges - YouTube According to the recent study, one type of bacteria, Moraxella osloensis, which survived the sponge’s run in the microwave, is also attributed with making dirty laundry stink, according to a 2012 study. Place it in a shallow microwave-safe container. “It was one to two orders of magnitude more than we initially expected to find,” says Markus Egert, professor of microbiology and hygiene at Furtwangen University, who led the study. Get unlimited access when you subscribe. A 2017 study found that the kitchen sponge you’re using may contain as many as 45 billion bacteria per square centimeter. The cleaning did seem to alter the composition of the bacterial population, though, shifting it toward Moraxella and Chryseobacterium, both of which can cause disease. You can’t clean a sponge enough to get rid of all the bacteria. Allow it to cool 15 minutes. The study comes with another, more provocative claim as well: cleaning sponges doesn’t seem to help at all. It was funded by the Institute of Applied Research (IAF) of Furtwangen University and published in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Scientific Reports on an open-access basis, so it can be read free of charge online. Researchers from Furtwangen University described kitchen sponges as a "common microbial hot spot," International Business Times reports.The study included DNA analysis of 14 kitchen sponges taken from private …
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